Chinese New Year Recipes

Posted by: Scott Ko

Chinese New Year is an important traditional festival celebrated by the Chinese around the world. This year Chinese New Year falls on February 19th.  It’s the year of the goat!

With the deafening sounds of firecrackers and drum pounding lion dancers, it’s definitely not a peaceful festival. The loud noises are to scare the bad spirits and the bad luck from yesteryear, to start afresh. Families also engage in a sort of  ‘spring-clean’, thoroughly cleaning their houses, wearing new clothes and sweeping away any ill fortune to make room for good luck. The family feast is also a tradition, where family members come together to eat traditional Chinese New Year food such as Longevity noodles, Vegetarian dishes and Year Cake (those round brown cakes with the big chinese character pasted on them). Bring on those red packets!

Why not get into the Chinese New year spirit with your own Chinese feast at own? Gong Xi Fa Cai!

 Beef Stir- fry with mushrooms and oyster sauce on noodles

Longevity noodles symbolise living to a ripe old age. If you can buy some  fresh handmade noodles from a Chinese restaurant, please do! However, your standard egg noodles is also fine for this recipe.

Beef Noodles

https://mealdish.com/recipe/beef-stir-fry-with-mushrooms-and-oyster-sauce-on-noodles

Cantonese Style Steam Fish

In China, a fish is served whole to symbolise prosperity. The word for fish ‘yu’, also sounds like the word for riches, so eating fish is said to make your wishes come true for the new year. In my opinion, eating fish whole is the best way to enjoy the dish, as the meat delicately falls off the bone.

Cantonese Style Fish

https://mealdish.com/recipe/cantonese-style-steamed-fish

Chinese Rice Congee with Pork 

You can’t get more Chinese than eating congree? Similar to a porridge consistency, rice is simmered down in slow pressure cooker to create a smooth and warming rice soup. You can add whatever ingredients you like. Traditional ingredients include adding Century Egg, chicken strips, even offal. The dish is traditionally eaten for breakfast with Chinese doughnuts (you can buy these at any Asian bakery).

Congee

https://mealdish.com/recipe/chinese-rice-congee-with-pork

Chilli Beef with Chinese Spinach 

For some healthy greens and added spice, why not try this dish? Play around with variations on spinach varieties or even change the beef with pork for a slightly different flavour combination. Adjust the chilli to your liking.

Chili Beef with Chinese Spinach

https://mealdish.com/recipe/chilli-beef-with-chinese-spinach

Don’t forget to add these recipes to your meal plan. All these ingredients can be purchased from you local Asian grocer, although I wouldn’t be surprised if the supermarket has them too. Happy Chinese New Year!

 

 

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